proficient

[pruh-fish-uhnt]
adjective
1.
well-advanced or competent in any art, science, or subject; skilled: a proficient swimmer.
noun
2.
an expert.

Origin:
1580–90; < Latin prōficient- (stem of prōficiēns) present participle of prōficere to advance, make progress, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + -ficere, combining form of facere to make, do1. See -ent, efficient

proficiently, adverb
proficientness, noun
overproficient, adjective
overproficiently, adverb
underproficient, adjective


1. adept, competent, experienced, accomplished, able, finished.


1. unskilled, inept.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
proficient (prəˈfɪʃənt)
 
adj
1.  having great facility (in an art, occupation, etc); skilled
 
n
2.  an archaic word for an expert
 
[C16: from Latin prōficere to make progress, from pro-1 + facere to make]
 
pro'ficiency
 
n
 
pro'ficiently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

proficient
1580s, from L. proficientem (nom. proficiens), prp. of proficere "to make progress, be useful" (see proficiency).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The more the monks fought, the more proficient they became as fighters, and the
  more their fame grew.
Despite their challenge, many become proficient at geometry, stats and computer
  programming.
Seeing that you all are obviously so proficient in drug and narcotic detection,
  you must also excel at search and rescue.
Individual brain training games don't make you smarter-they make you more
  proficient at the brain training games.
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