blow out

Slang Dictionary

blow definition


  1. tv. & in.
    to leave (someplace) in a hurry. (See also blow town; blow the joint.) : It's late. I gotta blow.
  2. tv.
    to ruin something; to ruin an opportunity. : It was my last chance, and I blew it.
  3. n.
    a setback; an attack. : Acme Systems Industries suffered a blow to its plans to acquire ABC Steel Widgets.
  4. tv.
    to waste money; to spend money. : Mary blew forty bucks on a secondhand radio.
  5. in.
    to become very angry; to lose one's temper. (See also blow a fuse.) : Finally I had had enough, and I blew.
  6. in.
    to play a musical instrument, not necessarily a wind instrument. : He blows, and everybody listens.
  7. n.
    and blow-out. a drinking party. : What a blow over at Joe's. I'll never get sober. , We blew out of the blow-out at about midnight.
  8. tv.
    to snortany powdered drug; to take snuff. (Drugs.) : Those guys spend all their time blowing coke.
  9. in.
    to smoke marijuana. (Drugs.) : He sits there blowing by the hour. How can he afford it?
  10. n.
    cocaine. (Drugs.) : You can get some good blow over at that crack house.
  11. tv.
    to perform an act of oral sex on someone, especially males. (Usually objectionable.) : Tom was looking for some bone addict who would blow him for nothing.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Slang Dictionary

blow (so) out definition


  1. tv.
    to kill someone, especially with gunshots. : Lefty set out to blow Harry the Horse out once and for all.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

blow out

  1. Extinguish, especially a flame. For example, The wind blew out the candles very quickly. [1300s]

  2. Lose force or cease entirely, as in The storm will soon blow itself out and move out to sea. Also see blow over.

  3. Burst or rupture suddenly, as in This tire is about to blow out. This usage alludes to the escape of air under pressure. [Early 1900s]

  4. Also, blow out of the water. Defeat decisively, as in With a great new product and excellent publicity, we could blow the competition out of the water. This term originally was used in mid-19th-century naval warfare, where it meant to blast or shoot another vessel to pieces. It later was transferred to athletic and other kinds of defeat. [Slang; mid-1900s]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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