most stinking

stinking

[sting-king]
adjective
2.
Slang. very drunk; plastered.
3.
Slang. very rich: His father left him so much money he's stinking.
4.
contemptible; disgusting: a stinking shame.
adverb
5.
completely or extremely: stinking drunk.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English stinkinge, Old English stincende. See stink, -ing2

stinkingly, adverb
stinkingness, noun


1. smelly, putrid, rotten, putrescent, foul, miasmal, rank.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
stinking (ˈstɪŋkɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  having a foul smell
2.  informal unpleasant or disgusting
3.  slang (postpositive) very drunk
 
adv
4.  informal (intensifier, expressing contempt for the person referred to): stinking rich
 
'stinkingly
 
adv
 
'stinkingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

stink
O.E. stincan "emit a smell of any kind" (class III strong verb; past tense stonc), from W.Gmc. *stenkwanan (cf. O.S. stincan, O.H.G. stinkan, Du. stinken), from the root of stench. O.E. swote stincan "to smell sweet," but offensive sense began O.E. and was primary by mid-13c.;
smell now tends the same way. Figurative meaning "be offensive" is from early 13c.; meaning "be inept" is recorded from 1924. The noun is attested from c.1300; sense of "extensive fuss" first recorded 1812. Stinking in ref. to "drunk" first attested 1887; stinking rich dates from 1956. To stink to high heaven first recorded 1963. Stinker as a term of abuse (often banteringly) is attested from c.1600; also in the same sense was stinkard (c.1600).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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