Word of the Day

Wednesday, June 09, 1999

captious

\KAP-shuhs\ , adjective;
1.
Marked by a disposition to find fault or raise objections.
2.
Calculated to entrap or confuse, as in an argument.
Quotes:
The most common among those are captious individuals who can find nothing wrong with their own actions but everything wrong with the actions of everybody else.
-- "In-Closet Hypocrites", Atlanta Inquirer, August 15, 1998
Mr Bowman had, I think, been keeping Christmas Eve, and was a little inclined to be captious: at least, he was not on foot very early, and to judge from what I could hear, neither men nor maids could do anything to please him.
-- M. R. James, The Haunted Dolls' House and Other Stories
Most authors would prefer readers such as Roiphe over captious academic critics.
-- Steven Moore, "Old Flames", Washington Post, November 26, 2000
With the imperturbablest bland clearness, he, for five hours long, keeps answering the incessant volley of fiery captious questions.
-- Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution
Origin:
Captious is derived from Latin captiosus, "sophistical, captious, insidious," from captio, "a taking, a fallacy, sophism," from capere, "to take, to seize."
POWERED BY 4INFO
Get Word of the Day
Free Email Sign Up
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
About PRIVACY POLICY Terms Careers Advertise with Us Contact Us Our Blog Suggest a Word Help