Word of the Day

Tuesday, November 09, 1999

garrulous

\GAIR-uh-lus; GAIR-yuh-\ , adjective;
1.
Talking much, especially about commonplace or trivial things; talkative.
2.
Wordy.
Quotes:
Without saying a single word she managed to radiate disapproval . . . the air seemed to grow heavy with it and the most garrulous talker would wilt and fall silent.
-- Mark Amory, Lord Berners: The Last Eccentric
He was as garrulous as a magpie.
-- Ferdinand Mount, Jem (and Sam)
The garrulous ancient was for once holding his tongue.
-- William Black, Madcap Violet
Crammed with gossip, anecdotes, and confessions . . ., his garrulous, untidy narratives read like a good novel.
-- James Atlas, "A Modern Whitman", The Atlantic, December 1984
He took a great liking to this Rev. Mr. Peters, and talked with him a great deal: told him yarns, gave him toothsome scraps of personal history, and wove a glittering streak of profanity through his garrulous fabric that was refreshing to a spirit weary of the dull neutralities of undecorated speech.
-- Mark Twain, "Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion II", The Atlantic, November 1877
Origin:
Garrulous is from Latin garrulus, from garrire, "to chatter, to babble."
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