Word of the Day

Tuesday, July 25, 2000

opprobrium

\uh-PRO-bree-uhm\ , noun;
1.
Disgrace; infamy; reproach mingled with contempt.
2.
A cause or object of reproach or disgrace.
Quotes:
Typically academic, they disdainfully observed about many university press books--"too dry, too specialized, too self-absorbed for us." In their world, the word "academic" was as much a term of opprobrium as the word "middlebrow" was in mine.
-- Janice A. Radway, A Feeling for Books
Five months after Malaysia incurred global opprobrium by closing off its currency and capital markets, its officials are in no mood to apologize.
-- Mark Landler, "Malaysia Says Its Much-Criticized Financial Strategy Has Worked", New York Times, February 14, 1999
Origin:
Opprobrium derives from Latin opprobrare, "to reproach," from ob, "in the way of" + probrum, "reproach." The adjective form is opprobrious.
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