Word of the Day

Tuesday, November 28, 2000

perambulate

\puh-RAM-byuh-layt\ , intransitive verb;
1.
To walk about; to roam; to stroll; as, "he perambulated in the park."
transitive verb:
1.
To walk through or over.
2.
To travel over for the purpose of surveying or inspecting.
Quotes:
Every weekend, the police close off ten to fifteen blocks of some Manhattan avenue. The merchants line the curbs, and the New Yorkers slowly perambulate up and down.
-- Richard Brookhiser, "Island Bazaar", National Review, July 1, 2002
At Syon, we perambulate a succession of rooms of the greatest magnificence, beginning with the entrance hall, with an apse of columns -- characteristic of Adam, all dazzling whiteness.
-- A. L. Rowse, "At Home with History in London", New York Times, January 19, 1986
If you don't like boats -- and it's surprising how many people who come here don't like boats -- you can perambulate the shoreline, take a swim, sit in the lounge and read, or do nothing more than sit on the dock
-- Eric Kraft, Leaving Small's Hotel
She liked to perambulate the room with a duster in her hand, with which she stopped to polish the backs of already lustrous books, musing and romancing as she did so.
-- Virginia Woolf, Night and Day
Origin:
Perambulate comes from Latin per-, "through" + ambulare, "to walk." The noun form is perambulation.
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