Word of the Day

Sunday, July 22, 2001

cohort

\KOH-hort\ , noun;
1.
A group or band of people.
2.
A companion; an associate.
3.
A group of people sharing a common statistical factor (as age or membership in a class) in a demographic study.
4.
(Roman Antiquity) A body of about 300 to 600 soldiers; the tenth part of a legion.
5.
Any group or body of warriors.
Quotes:
Ultimately we could have the know-how to breed these groups of human beings -- called 'clones' after the Greek word for a throng -- to produce a cohort of super-astronauts or dustmen, soldiers or senators, each with identical physical and mental characteristics most suited to do the job they have to do.
-- William Breckon,
We, he indicated his cohorts, "are stopping at the Marriot.
-- Hilary Mantel, Eight Months on Ghazzah Street
If his own cohorts strayed from the path of honor, he was quick to become the most terrible of enemies.
-- Adrian Frazier, George Moore, 1852-1933
Worldwide, about 7 percent of the relevant age cohort (twenty to twenty-four years) attend postsecondary educational institutions--a statistic that has shown an increase each decade since World War II.
-- Thomas J. Stanley, The Millionaire Next Door
Some of Custer's harsh juvenile humor was shared by his cavalry cohort, who put a premium on toughness.
-- Louise Barnett, Touched by Fire
Origin:
Cohort derives from Latin cohors, "an enclosure, a yard," hence, "a division of an army camp," hence "a troop, a company," hence, "a division of the Roman army."
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