Word of the Day

Sunday, July 11, 2004

acrimony

\AK-ruh-moh-nee\ , noun;
1.
Bitter, harsh, or biting sharpness, as of language, disposition, or manners.
Quotes:
In years to come, liturgical infighting ranked alongside disputed patents, contested fortunes, and savage political feuds as a source of McCormick family acrimony.
-- Richard Norton Smith, The Colonel
The partnership eventually broke up in acrimony.
-- Henry Grunwald, One Man's America
As losses swelled, acrimony led to lawsuits, countersuits, and the bankruptcy of the ironworks.
-- Patricia O'Toole, Money & Morals in America
Mr. Cioran himself once wrote: "However much I have frequented the mystics, deep down I have always sided with the Devil; unable to equal him in power, I have tried to be worthy of him, at least, in insolence, acrimony, arbitrariness and caprice."
-- Eric Pace, "E. M. Cioran, 84, Novelist And Philosopher of Despair", New York Times, June 22, 1995
Origin:
Acrimony is from Latin acrimonia, from acer, "sharp."
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