Word of the Day

Tuesday, October 05, 2004

didactic

\dy-DAK-tik; duh-\ , adjective;
1.
Fitted or intended to teach; conveying instruction; instructive; teaching some moral lesson; as, "didactic essays."
2.
Inclined to teach or moralize excessively; moralistic.
Quotes:
The show trial may be defined as a public theatrical performance in the form of a trial, didactic in purpose, intended not to establish the guilt of the accused but rather to demonstrate the heinousness of the person's crimes.
-- Sheila Fitzpatrick, Everyday Stalinism
In class, embarrassed girlish laughter joined the "hee-haws" of our male classmates when centerfolds appeared in the middle of medical lectures, ostensibly to add a wake-up jolt to otherwise uninspired didactic presentations.
-- Frances K. Conley M.D., Walking Out on the Boys
While Cooper offers a nice message about the demands of friendship and the need to share and be flexible, her writing is not the least bit didactic or dogmatic.
-- Stephen Del Vecchio, review of Pumpkin Soup, by Helen Cooper, Teacher Magazine, May 2000
Origin:
Didactic comes from Greek didaktikos, "skillful in teaching," from didaktos, "taught," from didaskein, "to teach, to educate."
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