Word of the Day

Thursday, June 09, 2005

durance

\DUR-uhn(t)s; DYUR-\ , noun;
1.
Imprisonment; confinement or restraint by or as if by force (usually used in the phrase "durance vile").
2.
[Archaic] Endurance.
Quotes:
As any ex-con emerging from durance vile eventually realizes, things haven't remained the same on the outside while he was doing time.
-- "Deri's non-comeback", Jerusalem Post, June 27, 2003
Escaping from durance vile, our hero discovers the village where his colleague parked the trusty Tiger Moth.
-- Frederick Forsyth, "Impatient with The English Patient", Spectator, March 29, 1997
One is like a prisoner, without a moment's respite from durance vile.
-- Leah Garrett, "Trains and Train Travel in Modern Yiddish Literature", Jewish Social Studies, January 1, 2001
Origin:
Durance is from Middle English duraunce, "duration," from Old French durance, from durer, "to last; to endure," from Latin durare.
POWERED BY 4INFO
Get Word of the Day
Free Email Sign Up
Other Delivery Options:
Mobile app
iGoogle
Mac
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Spanish
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
About PRIVACY POLICY Terms Careers Advertise with Us Contact Us Our Blog Suggest a Word Help