Word of the Day

Thursday, March 27, 2008

acrid

\AK-rid\ , adjective;
1.
Sharp and harsh, or bitter to the taste or smell; pungent.
2.
Caustic in language or tone; bitter.
Quotes:
There was burning jet fuel everywhere. Acrid, black smoke billowed across the water.
-- Simon Worrall, "The Night the Sea Burnt", Independent, July 6, 1997
He rips off another match, lights it, and uses it to light another cigarette. He shakes out the match, takes a puff, letting the acrid, unfiltered taste burn the back of his throat.
-- Kris Rusch, Hitler's Angel
The goal of sequencing the human gene set has been the subject of acrid debate among biologists.
-- Philip J. Hilts, "Head of Gene Map Threatens to Quit", New York Times, April 9, 1992
Paz's outspoken criticism of Cuba's brand of socialism placed him increasingly at odds with his colleagues. It led to a prolonged, sometimes acrid feud between him and the more left-leaning Fuentes.
-- "Octavio Paz Mexico's Literary Giant, Dead at 84", New York Times, April 21, 1998
Origin:
Acrid comes from Latin acer, "sharp."
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