Word of the Day

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

inchoate

\in-KOH-it\ , adjective;
1.
In an initial or early stage; just begun.
2.
Imperfectly formed or formulated.
Quotes:
Mildred Spock believed that, at about the age of three, her children's inchoate wills were to be shaped like vines sprouting up a beanpole.
-- Thomas Maier, Dr. Spock: An American Life
She also had a vision, not yet articulated, an inchoate sense of some special calling that awaited her.
-- Linda Lear, Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature
You take on a project because of the feeling, perhaps inchoate, that it may in some way contribute to your deeper understanding of the larger-scale research program you have chosen as your life's work.
-- Christopher Scholz, Fieldwork: A Geologist's Memoir of the Kalahari
Origin:
Inchoate comes from the past participle of Latin inchoare, alteration of incohare, "to begin."
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