Word of the Day

Monday, November 08, 2010

demotic

\dih-MOT-ik\ , adjective;
1.
Of or pertaining to the common people; popular.
2.
Of or pertaining to the ordinary, everyday, current form of a language; vernacular.
3.
Of, pertaining to, or noting the simplified form of hieratic writing used in ancient Egypt between 700 b.c. and a.d. 500.
Quotes:
The unmistakable Roth delivery - that inimitably juicy, excoriating, grandstanding blend of the demotic and the literary that peaks in ranting splendour in the best of his long novels - is here reduced to a narrative voice that seems to flirt with banality.
-- "Critical eye: Book Reviews Roundup," www.guardian.co.uk, October, 2010.
Allying himself with the socialist tendency within the movement, Rotas sought to support demotic culture and its language.
-- Peter Holland, Writing about Shakespeare
Origin:
Demotic stems from the same Greek root as democracy, demotikos, "of or for the common people." Originally, the term described the simpler of two forms of ancient Egyptian writing.
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