Word of the Day

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

moot

\moot\ , adjective;
1.
Open to discussion or debate; doubtful.
2.
Of little or no practical value or meaning; purely academic.
3.
Chiefly Law Not actual; theoretical; hypothetical.
verb:
1.
To present or introduce (any point, subject, project, etc.) for discussion.
2.
To reduce or remove the practical significance of; make purely theoretical or academic.
3.
Archaic To argue (a case), especially in a mock court.
noun:
1.
An assembly of the people in early England exercising political, administrative, and judicial powers.
2.
An argument or discussion, especially of a hypothetical legal case.
3.
Obsolete A debate, argument, or discussion.
Quotes:
“What do you mean, 'moot'?” “I mean moot. It's taken care of. The documents are notarized. I'm recouping my lawyer's fees and that's the end of it.”
-- Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections
As for Maddy, my only point would be that a suitable age for dating becomes moot if nobody's asking.
-- Marion K. Douglas, Dance Hall Road
Origin:
Moot is derived from the Old English gemot "meeting.” The adj. senses of "debatable" and "not worth considering" arose from moot case, earlier simply moot (n.) "discussion of a hypothetical law case" (1530s), in law student jargon, in reference to students gathering to test their skills in mock cases.
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