Word of the Day

Thursday, April 12, 2012

macaronic

\mak-uh-RON-ik\ , adjective;
1.
Composed of a mixture of languages.
2.
Composed of or characterized by Latin words mixed with vernacular words or non-Latin words given Latin endings.
3.
Mixed; jumbled.
noun:
1.
Macaronics, macaronic language.
2.
A macaronic verse or other piece of writing.
Quotes:
The tradition is even more significant in Folengo's Italian works and especially in his macaronic writings.
-- Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World
The macaronic mode swivels between different languages. I believe Beckett chose French against English for similar reasons to those of Jean Arp in selecting French against German.
-- W. D. Redfern, French Laughter: Literary Humour from Diderot to Tournier
The journalistic multiplicity of voices found in the Magazine corresponded with the poetic multi-vocality of Fergusson's macaronic compositions, texts that combined elements of neo-classical English and vernacular Scots diction.
-- Ian Brown, The Edinburgh History of Scottish Literature
Origin:
Macaronic is related to the word macaroni. Specifically, the pasta is named after the Southern Italian dialect maccarone, which was also associated with a mixture of Latin and vernacular languages.
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