Word of the Day

Saturday, September 08, 2012

manifold

\MAN-uh-fohld\ , adjective;
1.
Of many kinds; numerous and varied: manifold duties.
2.
Having numerous different parts, elements, features, forms, etc.: a manifold program for social reform.
noun:
1.
Something having many different parts or features.
2.
A copy or facsimile, as of something written, such as is made by manifolding
verb:
1.
To make copies of, as with carbon paper.
Quotes:
The possible moves being not only manifold, but involute, the chances of such oversights are multiplied; and in nine cases out of ten, it is the more concentrative rather than the more acute player who conquers.
-- Edgar Allen Poe, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," Great Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe
Whatever his arrangements are, however, they are always a pattern of neatness; and every one of the manifold articles connected with his manifold occupations is to be found in its own particular place.
-- Charles Dickens, Master Humphrey's Clock
Origin:
Manifold comes from the Old English word monigfald meaning "varied in appearance." The English suffix -fold originally meant "of so many parts."
POWERED BY 4INFO
Get Word of the Day
Free Email Sign Up
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
About PRIVACY POLICY Terms Careers Advertise with Us Contact Us Our Blog Suggest a Word Help