Word of the Day Archive
February 2013

  1. atavistic: reverting to or suggesting the characteristics of a remote ancestor or primitive type.
  2. boustrophedon: an ancient method of writing in which the lines run alternately from right to left and from left to right.
  3. counterfactual: a conditional statement the first clause of which expresses something contrary to fact, as “If I had known.”
  4. dyslogistic: conveying disapproval or censure; not complimentary or eulogistic.
  5. epexegesis: the addition of a word or words to explain a preceding word or sentence.
  6. feuilleton: a part of a European newspaper devoted to light literature, fiction, criticism, etc.
  7. gastronomy: the art or science of good eating.
  8. hent: to seize.
  9. irrefrangible: not to be broken or violated; inviolable.
  10. Jacobin: an extreme radical, especially in politics.
  11. kinchin: a child.
  12. lollapalooza: an extraordinary or unusual thing, person, or event; an exceptional example or instance.
  13. mainour: a stolen article found on the person of or near the thief.
  14. nuque: the back of the neck.
  15. obnubilate: to cloud over; becloud; obscure.
  16. paraph: a flourish made after a signature, as in a document, originally as a precaution against forgery.
  17. quittance: recompense or requital.
  18. recant: to withdraw or disavow a statement, opinion, etc., especially formally.
  19. satrap: a subordinate ruler, often a despotic one.
  20. tensile: capable of being stretched or drawn out; ductile.
  21. umber: shade; shadow.
  22. varia: miscellaneous items, especially a miscellany of literary works.
  23. whipsaw: to subject to two opposing forces at the same time.
  24. xeric: adapted to a dry environment.
  25. yare: quick; agile; lively.
  26. zakuska: an hors d'oeuvre.
  27. zephyrean: full of or containing light breezes.
  28. ziggurat: a temple of Sumerian origin in the form of a pyramidal tower.

 







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