Word of the Day

Friday, March 07, 2014

fallacy

\FAL-uh-see\ , noun;
1.
a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.: That the world is flat was at one time a popular fallacy.
2.
a misleading or unsound argument.
3.
deceptive, misleading, or false nature; erroneousness.
4.
Logic. any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.
5.
Obsolete. deception.
Quotes:
"Mind you, I see the fallacy," he said. He liked the word. It was an honest admission of error.
-- George Friel, The Boy Who Wanted Peace, 1964
Because it has been his practice to listen to all that could be said against him; to profit by as much of it as was just, and expound to himself, and upon occasion to others, the fallacy of what was fallacious.
-- John Stuart Mill, On Liberty, 1859
Origin:
Fallacy came to English in the 1300s from the Latin fallācia meaning "a trick."
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