Word of the Day

Sunday, April 13, 2014

prelusive

\pri-LOO-siv\ , adjective;
1.
introductory.
Quotes:
Hepzibah involuntarily thought of the ghostly harmonies, prelusive of death in the family, which were attributed to the legendary Alice.
-- Nathaniel Hawthorne, The House of the Seven Gables, 1851
Nay, which never in any other instance happened to the most fortunate poet, his very inaugural essays in verse were treated, not as prelusive efforts of auspicious promise, but as finished works of art, entitled to take their station amongst the literature of the land...
-- Thomas de Quincey, "Alexander Pope," Biographical Essays, 1850
Origin:
Prelusive is rooted in the Latin word praelūsiōn- which meant "a prelude."
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