Word of the Day

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

obliquity

\uh-BLIK-wi-tee, oh-BLIK-\ , noun;
1.
divergence from moral conduct, rectitude, etc.; immorality, dishonesty, or the like.
2.
the state of being oblique.
3.
an instance of such divergence.
4.
mental perversity.
5.
an instance of mental perversity.
6.
an inclination or a degree of inclination.
7.
a confusing or obscure statement or passage of writing, especially one deliberately made obscure.
8.
Also called obliquity of the ecliptic. Astronomy. the angle between the plane of the earth's orbit and that of the earth's equator, equal to 23°27′; the inclination of the earth's equator.
Quotes:
But that is not all, that is not his worst defect; his worst defect is his perpetual moral obliquity, perpetual from the days of the Flood to the Schleswig Holstein period.
-- Fyodor Dostoyevsky, translated by Constance Garnett, Notes from Underground, 1864, translation published in 1918
…this obliquity is curious insofar as it gives birth to an upright form, whose very verticality absorbs its departure in slanting forms, and here there is a kind of agreeable challenge for the visitor…
-- Roland Barthes, "The Eiffel Tower," A Barthes Reader, 1982
A decade ago Hustvedt published a best-selling novel, "What I Loved," which reimagines the events with all the obliquity of an episode of "Law & Order."
-- Dana Goodyear, "Long Short Story," The New Yorker, March 17, 2014
Origin:
Obliquity is related to the Latin word oblīquitās which meant "oblique."
POWERED BY 4INFO
Get Word of the Day
Free Email Sign Up
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
About PRIVACY POLICY Terms Careers Advertise with Us Contact Us Our Blog Suggest a Word Help