abolitionist

[ab-uh-lish-uh-nist]
noun
1.
(especially prior to the Civil War) a person who advocated or supported the abolition of slavery in the U.S.
2.
a person who favors the abolition of any law or practice deemed harmful to society: the abolitionists who are opposed to capital punishment.

Origin:
1830–40; abolition + -ist

proabolitionist, noun, adjective
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World English Dictionary
abolition (ˌæbəˈlɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished; annulment
2.  (often capital) (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
3.  (often capital) (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
 
[C16: from Latin abolitio, from abolēre to destroy]
 
abo'litionary
 
adj
 
abo'litionism
 
n
 
abo'litionist
 
n, —adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abolitionist
1836, from abolitionism. In Britain, applied 20c. to advocates of ending capital punishment.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Before too long, both may fall into the abolitionist camp.
But as the abolitionist movement grew, no one wanted to remember that.
But even with a nuclear abolitionist in charge, advocates of modernizing the arsenal are pushing back.
He failed, and any successor who wants to arrest the abolitionist trend is likely also to be frustrated.
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