abstruse

[ab-stroos]
adjective
1.
hard to understand; recondite; esoteric: abstruse theories.
2.
Obsolete. secret; hidden.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin abstrūsus thrust away, concealed (past participle of abstrūdere), equivalent to abs- abs- + trūd- thrust + -tus past participle suffix

abstrusely, adverb
abstruseness, noun

abstruse, obtuse.


1. incomprehensible, unfathomable, arcane.


1. clear, uncomplicated, simple; obvious.
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World English Dictionary
abstruse (əbˈstruːs)
 
adj
not easy to understand; recondite; esoteric
 
[C16: from Latin abstrūsus thrust away, concealed, from abs-ab-1 + trūdere to thrust]
 
ab'strusely
 
adv
 
ab'struseness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abstruse
c.1600, from L. abstrusus, pp. of abstrudere "conceal," lit. "to thrust away," from ab- "away" + trudere "to thrust, push" (see extrusion).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Unfortunately, it is sometimes difficult for the economic operators to
  comprehend the abstruse provisions correctly.
If your initial topic seems abstruse, consider the motivation that led you to
  it in the first place.
It's often stimulating, but too abstruse for the average reader.
Despite its success, readers confessed to difficulty in grasping its more
  abstruse concepts.
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