Alcamo

Alcamo

[ahl-kuh-moh, al-; Italian ahl-kah-maw]
noun
a city in NW Sicily, Italy, near the site of the ancient Greek settlement of Segesta.
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alcamo

town, northwestern Sicily, Italy, 23 miles (37 km) west-southwest of Palermo. The name comes from that of the nearby Saracen fortress, Alqamah, on Mount Bonifato. The present town was founded by the emperor Frederick II in 1233. Notable churches include the 17th-century Assunta Church and the Church of San Tomaso with an elaborate 14th-century doorway. There is also a castle that dates from the 14th century. Alcamo is an agricultural and industrial centre and is noted for its winemaking. Pop. (2006 est.) mun., 45,098.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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