berks

Berkshire

[burk-sheer, -sher; British bahrk-sheer, -sher]
noun
1.
Also called Berks [burks; British bahrks] . a county in S England. 485 sq. mi. (1255 sq. km).
2.
one of an English breed of black hogs, having white markings on the feet, face, and tail.
3.
a steam locomotive having a two-wheeled front truck, eight driving wheels, and a four-wheeled rear truck.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Berks
Collins
World English Dictionary
Berks (bɑːks)
 
abbreviation for
Berkshire

Berkshire (ˈbɑːkʃɪə, -ʃə)
 
n
1.  Berks a historic county of S England: since reorganization in 1974 the River Thames has marked the N boundary while the Berkshire Downs occupy central parts; the county council was replaced by six unitary authorities in 1998. Area: 1259 sq km (486 sq miles)
2.  a rare breed of pork and bacon pig having a black body and white points

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Berkshire
O.E. Bearrocscir (893), from an ancient Celtic name meaning "hilly place" + O.E. scir "shire, district."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

berks

county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., bounded to the north by Blue Mountain. It consists mostly of mountainous terrain in the Appalachian Ridge and Valley physiographic province-except for the southern corner, which consists of rolling piedmont. The principal streams are the Schuylkill and Conestoga rivers and Maiden, Hay, Northkill, Tulpehocken, Allegheny, Monocacy, and Manatawny creeks. Recreation areas include Ontelaunee and Blue Marsh lakes, as well as Nolde Forest and French Creek state parks. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail follows Blue Mountain along the northwestern edge of the county.

Learn more about Berks with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature