bland

bland

[bland]
adjective, blander, blandest.
1.
pleasantly gentle or agreeable: a bland, affable manner.
2.
soothing or balmy, as air: a bland southern breeze.
3.
nonirritating, as food or medicines: a bland diet.
4.
not highly flavored; mild; tasteless: a bland sauce.
5.
lacking in special interest, liveliness, individuality, etc.; insipid; dull: a bland young man; a bland situation comedy.
6.
unemotional, indifferent, or casual: his bland acknowledgment of guilt.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin blandus of a smooth tongue, pleasant, soothing

blandly, adverb
blandness, noun


1. affable, mild, amiable; suave, urbane. 2, 3. soft, mild.


1. cruel; boorish. 2. harsh. 3. irritating.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Bland

[bland]
noun
James A(llen) 1854–1911, U.S. songwriter and minstrel performer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
bland (blænd)
 
adj
1.  devoid of any distinctive or stimulating characteristics; uninteresting; dull: bland food
2.  gentle and agreeable; suave
3.  (of the weather) mild and soothing
4.  unemotional or unmoved: a bland account of atrocities
 
[C15: from Latin blandus flattering]
 
'blandly
 
adv
 
'blandness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bland
1660s, from It. blando "delicate," or O.Fr. bland "flattering, complimentary," both from L. blandus "mild, smooth, flattering, alluring," perhaps from PIE *mlad-, nasalized variant of base *mldu- "soft." Latin also had blandiloquentulus "flattering in speech," which might have yielded a useful English
*blandiloquent.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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