browser

[brou-zer]
noun
1.
a person or thing that browses.
2.
Also called Web browser. Digital Technology. a software program that allows the user to find and read encoded documents in a form suitable for display, especially such a program for use on the World Wide Web.

nonbrowser, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
browser (ˈbraʊzə)
 
n
1.  a person or animal that browses
2.  computing a software package that enables a user to find and read hypertext files, esp on the World Wide Web

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
browser   (brou'zər)  Pronunciation Key 
A program that accesses and displays files and other data available on the Internet and other networks. Entering a website's URL in the address window of a browser will bring up that website in the browser's main window.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

browser definition


See Web browser.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

browser definition

hypertext
A program which allows a person to read hypertext. The browser gives some means of viewing the contents of nodes (or "pages") and of navigating from one node to another.
Netscape Navigator, NCSA Mosaic, Lynx, and W3 are examples for browsers for the World-Wide Web. They act as clients to remote web servers.
(1996-05-31)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
New browser software can protect websites from software vulnerabilities.
Cloud computing is dependant on the performance of the web, the software, the local machine and the browser itself.
In the new browser war, privacy is a crucial battleground.
If you're reading this online, chances are good that you are using a web
  browser to do so.
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