cambric

[keym-brik]
noun
a thin, plain cotton or linen fabric of fine close weave, usually white.

Origin:
1520–30; earlier cameryk, after Kameryk, Dutch name of Cambrai

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Collins
World English Dictionary
cambric (ˈkeɪmbrɪk)
 
n
a fine white linen or cotton fabric
 
[C16: from Flemish KamerijkCambrai]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cambric
late 14c., from Kamerijk, Flemish form of Cambrai, city in northern France where the cloth was originally made, from L. Camaracum. The modern form of the English word has elements from both versions of the name.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

cambric

lightweight, closely woven, plain cotton cloth first made in Cambrai, France, and originally a fine linen fabric. Printed cambric was used in London by 1595 for bands, cuffs, and ruffs. Modern cambric is made from choice American or Egyptian cotton, with both warp and weft, or filling, yarns ranging from 60 to 80 in size (count), and is usually lightly calendered to produce a slight gloss on one side.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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