canonize

[kan-uh-nahyz]
verb (used with object), canonized, canonizing.
1.
Ecclesiastical. to place in the canon of saints.
2.
to glorify.
3.
to make canonical; place or include within a canon, especially of scriptural works: They canonized the Song of Solomon after much controversy.
4.
to consider or treat as sacrosanct or holy: They canonized his many verbal foibles and made them gospel.
5.
to sanction or approve authoritatively, especially ecclesiastically.
6.
Archaic. to deify.
Also, especially British, canonise.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English. See canon1, -ize

canonization, noun
canonizer, noun
supercanonization, noun
uncanonization, noun
uncanonize, verb (used with object), uncanonized, uncanonizing.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
canonize or canonise (ˈkænəˌnaɪz)
 
vb
1.  RC Church to declare (a person) to be a saint and thus admit to the canon of saints
2.  to regard as holy or as a saint
3.  to sanction by canon law; pronounce valid
 
canonise or canonise
 
vb
 
canoni'zation or canonise
 
n
 
canoni'sation or canonise
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

canonize
late 14c., "to place in the canon or calendar of saints," from M.L. canonizare, from Gk. kanon "rule" (see canon). Related: Canonized (late 14c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Based on the opinions above, they should canonize him.
To hold him up as a saint would be to canonize political profligacy.
There is a temptation to rush to canonize your memory.
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