conductive

[kuhn-duhk-tiv]
adjective
having the property or capability of conducting.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin conduct(us) (see conduct) + -ive

conductively, adverb
nonconductive, adjective
unconductive, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
conductive (kənˈdʌktɪv)
 
adj
of, denoting, or having the property of conduction
 
con'ductively
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

conductive
1520s, from conduct + -ive. Physics sense is from 1840. Related: Conductivity (1837).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Lithium-ion batteries have two electrodes immersed in an electrically
  conductive solution, called an electrolyte.
The rotating, electrically conductive liquid core is what generates the
  planet's magnetic field.
Racists, it would seem, had the same concept of the conductive energy of sport
  and its potential to spread a gospel.
Electricity, meanwhile, is delivered via a conductive brush that sweeps around
  a metal ring in the stationary base.
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