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depart

[dih-pahrt] /dɪˈpɑrt/
verb (used without object)
1.
to go away; leave:
She departed from Paris today. The train departs at 10:52.
2.
to diverge or deviate (usually followed by from):
The new method departs from the old in several respects.
3.
to pass away, as from life or existence; die.
verb (used with object)
4.
to go away from; leave:
to depart this life.
noun
5.
Archaic. departure; death.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English departen < Old French departir, equivalent to de- de- + partir to go away; see part (v.)
Related forms
undeparting, adjective
Synonyms
1. Depart, retire, retreat, withdraw imply leaving a place. Depart is a somewhat literary word for going away from a place: to depart on a journey. Retire emphasizes absenting oneself or drawing back from a place: to retire from a position in battle. Retreat implies a necessary withdrawal, especially as a result of adverse fortune in war: to retreat to secondary lines of defense. Withdraw suggests leaving some specific place or situation, usually for some definite and often unpleasant reason: to withdraw from a hopeless task. 4. quit.
Antonyms
1. arrive.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for depart
  • Boats leave heavily laden, and many depart even without a satellite phone to use when trouble arises.
  • Editors at some houses have limited authority to depart from house style.
  • But researchers wanted to know why sons sometimes stay home over the winter and sometimes depart.
  • So along come the punctuated equilibrium postulates which deepen the mire because you completely depart from long term evolvement.
  • German trains depart exactly on the scheduled minute, not a minute later.
  • It's easy to poke fun at professors who depart from scholarly writing to tell the stories of their lives.
  • The prime anxiety is that the occupiers will depart too soon, leaving chaos in their wake.
  • Bugs arrive at the plant, find it a poor home, and quickly depart.
  • Each portrait had to depart utterly from the last, a surprise even to him.
  • Those already completed resembled silver spaceships about to depart.
British Dictionary definitions for depart

depart

/dɪˈpɑːt/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
to go away; leave
2.
to start out; set forth
3.
(usually foll by from) to deviate; differ; vary to depart from normal procedure
4.
(transitive) to quit (archaic, except in the phrase depart this life)
Word Origin
C13: from Old French departir, from de- + partir to go away, divide, from Latin partīrī to divide, distribute, from pars a part
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for depart
depart
early 13c., from O.Fr. departir, from L.L. departire "divide" (transitive), from de- "from" + partire "to part, divide," from pars (gen. partis) "a part." As a euphemism for "to die" (to depart this life) it is attested from c.1500. Transitive in Eng. lingers in some senses; the wedding service was till death us depart until 1662.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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