dough

[doh]
noun
1.
flour or meal combined with water, milk, etc., in a mass for baking into bread, cake, etc.; paste of bread.
2.
any similar soft, pasty mass.
3.
Slang. money.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English do(u)gh, do(u)h, dou(e), Old English dāg, dāh; cognate with Dutch deeg, Old Norse deig, Gothic daigs, German Teig

doughlike, adjective

doe, dough.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dough (dəʊ)
 
n
1.  a thick mixture of flour or meal and water or milk, used for making bread, pastry, etc
2.  any similar pasty mass
3.  a slang word for money
 
[Old English dāg; related to Old Norse deig, Gothic daigs, Old High German teig dough, Sanskrit degdhi he daubs; see dairy, duff1, lady]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dough
O.E. dag "dough," from P.Gmc. *daigaz "something kneaded," from PIE *dheigh- "to mould, to form, to knead" (cf. Skt. dehah "body," lit. "that which is formed," dih- "to besmear," digen "firm, solid," originally "kneaded into a compact mass;" Gk. teikhos "wall;" L. fingere "to form, fashion," figura "a
shape, form, figure;" Goth. deigan "to smear"). Meaning "money" is from 1851. Doughface was the contemptuous nickname in U.S. politics for Northern Democrats who worked in the interest of the South before the Civil War; it was taken to mean "man who allows himself to be moulded." The source is an 1820 speech by John Randolph of Roanoke, in the wake of the Missouri Compromise.
"Randolph, mocking the northerners intimidated by the South, referred to a children's game in which the players daubed their faces with dough and then looked in a mirror and scared themselves." [Daniel Walker Howe, "What Hath God Wrought," 2007]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Dough definition


(batsek, meaning "swelling," i.e., in fermentation). The dough the Israelites had prepared for baking was carried away by them out of Egypt in their kneading-troughs (Ex. 12:34, 39). In the process of baking, the dough had to be turned (Hos. 7:8).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

dough

mixture of flour and liquid with other ingredients, such as leavening agents, shortening, sugar, salt, eggs, and various flavouring materials, used to make baked products. A similar mixture, in more liquefied form, is known as batter

Learn more about dough with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
When the dough is cool enough to handle, form it into a large ball.
Press the dough onto a greased pan and add sauce, cheese, and toppings.
The resulting flour could then be whisked into a dough and cooked.
Here's our busy cook's take on a favorite appetizer, baked instead of fried,
  and with purchased dough instead of homemade.
Images for Dough
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