entire

[en-tahyuhr]
adjective
1.
having all the parts or elements; whole; complete: He wrote the entire novel in only six weeks.
2.
full or thorough: He has been given entire freedom of choice in this matter.
3.
not broken, mutilated, or decayed; intact: We were fortunate to find this relic entire.
4.
unimpaired or undiminished: His entire energies have gone into making the enterprise a success.
5.
being wholly of one piece; undivided; continuous: The entire mood of the symphony was joyful.
6.
Botany. without notches or indentations, as leaves.
7.
not gelded: an entire horse.
8.
Obsolete. wholly of one kind; unmixed or pure.
noun
9.
Archaic. the whole; entirety.
10.
an ungelded animal, especially a stallion.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English entere < Middle French entier < Latin integrum, accusative of integer whole; see integer

entireness, noun
subentire, adjective


1. See complete.


1. partial. 3. defective.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
entire (ɪnˈtaɪə)
 
adj
1.  (prenominal) whole; complete: the entire project is going well
2.  (prenominal) without reservation or exception; total: you have my entire support
3.  not broken or damaged; intact
4.  consisting of a single piece or section; undivided; continuous
5.  (of leaves, petals, etc) having a smooth margin not broken up into teeth or lobes
6.  not castrated: an entire horse
7.  obsolete of one substance or kind; unmixed; pure
 
n
8.  a less common word for entirety
9.  an uncastrated horse
10.  philately
 a.  a complete item consisting of an envelope, postcard, or wrapper with stamps affixed
 b.  on entire (of a stamp) placed on an envelope, postcard, etc, and bearing postal directions
 
[C14: from Old French entier, from Latin integer whole, from in-1 + tangere to touch]
 
en'tireness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

entire
late 14c., from O.Fr. entier "whole, complete," from L. integrum (nom. integer) "whole, complete," lit. "untouched," from in- "not" + root of tangere "to touch" (see tangent).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It is the first effort by a state to put its entire prison system under private
  control.
Indirect effects of climate change can also cause entire species to go extinct.
Hardpan may be present throughout an entire garden or only in certain parts of
  it.
Can check answers for single clues or entire puzzles.
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