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esteem

[ih-steem] /ɪˈstim/
verb (used with object)
1.
to regard highly or favorably; regard with respect or admiration:
I esteem him for his honesty.
2.
to consider as of a certain value or of a certain type; regard:
I esteem it worthless.
3.
Obsolete. to set a value on; appraise.
noun
4.
favorable opinion or judgment; respect or regard:
to hold a person in esteem.
5.
Archaic. opinion or judgment; estimation; valuation.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English estemen, < Middle French estimer < Latin aestimāre to fix the value of
Related forms
preesteem, verb (used with object)
unesteemed, adjective
well-esteemed, adjective
Synonyms
1. honor, revere, respect. See appreciate. 4. favor, admiration, honor, reverence, veneration. See respect.
Antonyms
1. disdain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for esteem
  • Good posture boosts self-esteem.
  • Self-esteem is built through learning and achievement, not flattery.
  • And hence, so many people with low self-esteem play this game to improve theirs.
  • What I do not see around me is lack of self esteem.
  • You see endless stories about how models, media and celebrities destroy womens self esteem.
  • Over the weekend, he worked on non-physical things — namely, his self-esteem and confidence.
  • Hard work is not held in such high esteem as it once was.
  • Don't let other people's issues and fears with self-esteem get in your way.
  • So low is his self-esteem that he's even afraid to try at baseball.
  • Social networks can lessen loneliness and boost self-esteem.
British Dictionary definitions for esteem

esteem

/ɪˈstiːm/
verb (transitive)
1.
to have great respect or high regard for: to esteem a colleague
2.
(formal) to judge or consider; deem: to esteem an idea improper
noun
3.
high regard or respect; good opinion
4.
(archaic) judgment; opinion
Derived Forms
esteemed, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Old French estimer, from Latin aestimāreestimate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for esteem
v.

mid-15c., from Middle French estimer (14c.), from Latin aestimare "to value, appraise," perhaps ultimately from *ais-temos "one who cuts copper," i.e. mints money (but de Vaan finds this "not very credible"). At first used as we would now use estimate; sense of "value, respect" is 1530s. Related: Esteemed; esteeming.

n.

(also steem, extyme), mid-14c., "account, worth," from French estime, from estimer (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "high regard" is from 1610s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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