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7 Essential Words of Fall

estimate

[v. es-tuh-meyt; n. es-tuh-mit, -meyt] /v. ˈɛs təˌmeɪt; n. ˈɛs tə mɪt, -ˌmeɪt/
verb (used with object), estimated, estimating.
1.
to form an approximate judgment or opinion regarding the worth, amount, size, weight, etc., of; calculate approximately:
to estimate the cost of a college education.
2.
to form an opinion of; judge.
verb (used without object), estimated, estimating.
3.
to make an estimate.
noun
4.
an approximate judgment or calculation, as of the value, amount, time, size, or weight of something.
5.
a judgment or opinion, as of the qualities of a person or thing.
6.
a statement of the approximate charge for work to be done, submitted by a person or business firm ready to undertake the work.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin aestimātus, past participle of aestimāre to value, estimate; see -ate1
Related forms
estimatingly, adverb
estimator, noun
preestimate, verb (used with object), preestimated, preestimating.
preestimate, noun
reestimate, verb (used with object), reestimated, reestimating.
reestimate, noun
self-estimate, noun
unestimated, adjective
well-estimated, adjective
Synonyms
1. compute, count, reckon, gauge, assess, value, evaluate, appraise. 4. valuation, calculation, appraisal.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for estimate
  • The department will use the estimates for budgetary purposes.
  • Can anyone give me a rough estimate on the entire download size of the beta.
  • The team estimates that shoreline habitats such as mussel beds affected by the spill will take up to 30 years to recover fully.
  • Scientists estimate the volcano formed fewer than 200000 years ago.
  • In Congress, the estimate met with a sober response.
  • This estimate may be conservative.
  • Administration officials said the new cost estimate was not ready .
  • Get another estimate, but start looking for a new car.
  • These two pictures were among the five that sold above their top estimates.
  • Get an estimate from one company then see if a competitor will beat it.
British Dictionary definitions for estimate

estimate

verb (ˈɛstɪˌmeɪt)
1.
to form an approximate idea of (distance, size, cost, etc); calculate roughly; gauge
2.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to form an opinion about; judge: to estimate one's chances
3.
to submit (an approximate price) for (a job) to a prospective client
4.
(transitive) (statistics) to assign a value (a point estimate) or range of values (an interval estimate) to a parameter of a population on the basis of sampling statistics See estimator
noun (ˈɛstɪmɪt)
5.
an approximate calculation
6.
a statement indicating the likely charge for or cost of certain work
7.
a judgment; appraisal; opinion
Derived Forms
estimative, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin aestimāre to assess the worth of, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for estimate
n.

1560s, "valuation," from Latin aestimatus, verbal noun from aestimare (see esteem). Earlier in sense "power of the mind" (mid-15c.). Meaning "approximate judgment" is from 1580s. As a builder's statement of projected costs, from 1796.

v.

1530s, "appraise the worth of," from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimare "to value, appraise" (see esteem). Meaning "form an approximate notion" is from 1660s. Related: Estimated; estimates; estimating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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