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gable

[gey-buh l] /ˈgeɪ bəl/
noun, Architecture
1.
the portion of the front or side of a building enclosed by or masking the end of a pitched roof.
2.
a decorative member suggesting a gable, used especially in Gothic architecture.
3.
Also called gable wall. a wall bearing a gable.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English < Old French (of Germanic orig.); cognate with Old Norse gafl; compare Old English gafol, geafel a fork
Related forms
gablelike, adjective

Gable

[gey-buh l] /ˈgeɪ bəl/
noun
1.
(William) Clark, 1901–60, U.S. film actor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for gable
  • She raised gable to be welldressed and wellgroomed he stood out from the other kids.
  • gable then moved to new york and dillon sought work for him on broadway.
  • gable then worked mainly in supporting roles, often as the villain.
  • gable flew to the site and saw the forest fire ignited by the burning plane.
  • Immediately after his discharge from the service, gable returned to his ranch and rested.
British Dictionary definitions for gable

gable

/ˈɡeɪbəl/
noun
1.
the triangular upper part of a wall between the sloping ends of a pitched roof (gable roof)
2.
a triangular ornamental feature in the form of a gable, esp as used over a door or window
3.
the triangular wall on both ends of a gambrel roof
Derived Forms
gabled, adjective
gable-like, adjective
Word Origin
C14: Old French gable, probably from Old Norse gafl; related to Old English geafol fork, Old High German gibil gable

Gable

/ˈɡeɪbəl/
noun
1.
(William) Clark. 1901–60, US film actor. His films include It Happened One Night (1934), San Francisco (1936), Gone with the Wind (1939), Mogambo (1953), and The Misfits (1960)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gable
gable
mid-14c., from O.Fr. gable, from O.N. gafl (in north of England, directly from O.N.), probably from a P.Gmc. root meaning "fork" (cf. O.E. gafol, geafel "fork," M.H.G. gabel "pitchfork"), from PIE *ghebhel (cf. O.Ir. gabul "forked twig"). So called from the Y-shaped timber supports of the roof at gable ends. Related: Gabled; gables.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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