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George

[jawrj] /dʒɔrdʒ/
noun
1.
a figure of St. George killing the dragon, especially one forming part of the insignia of the Order of the Garter.
2.
British Slang. any coin bearing the image of St. George.
3.
a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter G.
4.
British Slang. an automatic pilot on an airplane.
Idioms
5.
by George!, Chiefly British Informal. (an exclamation used to express astonishment, approval, etc.)

George

[jawrj; for 4 also German gey-ohr-guh] /dʒɔrdʒ; for 4 also German geɪˈoʊr gə/
noun
1.
David Lloyd, Lloyd George, David.
2.
Henry, 1839–97, U.S. economist: advocate of a single tax.
3.
Saint, died a.d. 303? Christian martyr: patron saint of England.
4.
Stefan Anton
[shte-fahn ahn-tohn] /ˈʃtɛ fɑn ˈɑn toʊn/ (Show IPA),
1868–1933, German poet.
5.
Lake, a lake in E New York. 36 miles (58 km) long.
6.
a river in NE Quebec, Canada, flowing N from the Labrador border to Ungava Bay. 350 miles (563 km) long.
7.
a male given name: from a Greek word meaning “farmer.”.

George I

noun
1.
1660–1727, king of England 1714–27.
2.
1845–1913, king of Greece 1863–1913.

George II

noun
1.
1683–1760, king of England 1727–60 (son of George I).
2.
1890–1947, king of Greece 1922–23 and 1935–47.

George III

noun
1.
1738–1820, king of England 1760–1820 (grandson of George II).

George IV

noun
1.
1762–1830, king of England 1820–30 (son of George III).

George V

noun
1.
1865–1936, king of England 1910–36 (son of Edward VII).

George VI

noun
1.
1895–1952, king of England 1936–1952 (second son of George V; brother of Edward VIII).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for George

George1

/dʒɔːdʒ/
noun
1.
David Lloyd. See Lloyd George
2.
Sir Edward (Alan John), known as Eddie. 1938–2009, British economist, governor of the Bank of England (1993–2003)
3.
Henry. 1839–97, US economist: advocated a single tax on land values, esp in Progress and Poverty (1879)
4.
Saint. died ?303 ad, Christian martyr, the patron saint of England; the hero of a legend in which he slew a dragon. Feast day: April 23
5.
(German) (ɡeˈɔrɡə). Stefan (Anton) (ˈʃtɛfan). 1868–1933, German poet and aesthete. Influenced by the French Symbolists, esp Mallarmé and later by Nietzsche, he sought for an idealized purity of form in his verse. He refused Nazi honours and went into exile in 1933

George2

/dʒɔːdʒ/
noun
1.
(Brit, informal) the automatic pilot in an aircraft
Word Origin
C20: originally a slang name for an airman

George I

noun
1.
1660–1727, first Hanoverian king of Great Britain and Ireland (1714–27) and elector of Hanover (1698–1727). His dependence in domestic affairs on his ministers led to the emergence of Walpole as the first prime minister

George II

noun
1.
1683–1760, king of Great Britain and Ireland and elector of Hanover (1727–60); son of George I. His victory over the French at Dettingen (1743) in the War of the Austrian Succession was the last appearance on a battlefield by a British king
2.
1890–1947, king of Greece (1922–24; 1935–47). He was overthrown by the republicans (1924) and exiled during the German occupation of Greece (1941–45)

George III

noun
1.
1738–1820, king of Great Britain and Ireland (1760–1820) and of Hanover (1814–20). During his reign the American colonies were lost. He became insane in 1811, and his son acted as regent for the rest of the reign

George IV

noun
1.
1762–1830, king of Great Britain and Ireland and also of Hanover (1820–30); regent (1811–20). His father (George III) disapproved of his profligate ways, which undermined the prestige of the crown, and of his association with the Whig opposition

George V

noun
1.
1865–1936, king of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and emperor of India (1910–36)

George VI

noun
1.
1895–1952, king of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (1936–52) and emperor of India (1936–47). The second son of George V, he succeeded to the throne after the abdication of his brother, Edward VIII
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for George

masc. personal name, from Late Latin Georgius, from Greek Georgos "husbandman, farmer," from ge "earth" + ergon "work" (see urge (v.)).

The name introduced in England by the Crusaders (a vision of St. George played a key role in the First Crusade), but not common until after the Hanoverian succession (18c.). St. George began to be recognized as patron of England in time of Edward III, perhaps because of his association with the Order of the Garter (see garter). His feast day, April 23, was made a holiday in 1222. The legend of his combat with the dragon is first found in "Legenda Aurea" (13c.). The exclamation by (St.) George! is recorded from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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George in Culture

George III definition


The king of Britain during the American Revolutionary War. He was known for insisting on royal privilege. The stubbornness of George and of his government officials is often blamed for the loss of the thirteen colonies that became the United States. In Britain itself, however, prosperity increased greatly while he was king, and Canada and India were made British possessions.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for George

george

verb

To invite to sexual activity; proposition: One of the girls georged him, just for kicks (1950s+ Black)


George

adjective

(also george) Excellent; great; superb: She's real George all the way (1951+ Teenagers)

interjection

by george (1731+)

noun
  1. The automatic pilot of an aircraft (1931+ British aviators)
  2. A theater usher (1950s+ Rock and roll)
Related Terms

let george do it

[aviation sense because George became the term for any airman in the British forces, like ''Jack'' for a sailor and ''Tommy'' for a soldier]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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George in Technology
language
One of the earliest programming languages, developed by Charles Hamblin in 1957. GEORGE was a stack oriented language, using reverse Polish notation. It was implemented on the English Electric DEUCE.
["GEORGE: A Semi-Translation Programming Scheme for the DEUCE, Programming and Operations Manual", C. L. Hamblin, U New S Wales, 1958].
["Computer Languages", C.L. Hamblin, Aust J Sci 20(5):135-139, Dec 1957 and Aust Comp J 17(4):195-198, Nov 1985]
(2007-03-18)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for George

king of Bohemia from 1458. As head of the conservative Utraquist faction of Hussite Protestants, he established himself as a power when Bohemia was still under Habsburg rule, and he was thereafter unanimously elected king by the estates. A nationalist and Hussite king of a prosperous state, he incurred the enmity of the papacy and Bohemia's Roman Catholic neighbours, which finally destroyed his power

Learn more about George with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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