Hal

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Hal

Chemistry.

hal-

variant of halo- before a vowel: halite.

Prince

[prins]
noun
1.
Harold S(mith) ("Hal") born 1928, U.S. stage director and producer.
2.
a male given name.

Wallis

[wol-is, waw-lis]
noun
1.
Harold Brent [brent] , ("Hal") 1899–1986, U.S. film producer.
2.
John, 1616–1703, English mathematician.
3.
a male given name, form of Wallace.
4.
a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
hal-
 
combining form
a variant of halo-

prince (prɪns)
 
n
1.  (in Britain) a son of the sovereign or of one of the sovereign's sons
2.  a nonreigning male member of a sovereign family
3.  the monarch of a small territory, such as Monaco, usually called a principality, that was at some time subordinate to an emperor or king
4.  any sovereign; monarch
5.  a nobleman in various countries, such as Italy and Germany
6.  an outstanding member of a specified group: a merchant prince
7.  informal (US), (Canadian) a generous and charming man
 
[C13: via Old French from Latin princeps first man, ruler, chief]
 
'princelike
 
adj

Prince (prɪns)
 
n
full name Prince Rogers Nelson. born 1958, US rock singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist. His albums include Dirty Mind (1981), Purple Rain (1984), Parade (1986), and Emancipation (1996); in 2007 he released his latest album Planet Earth as a free gift with a British newspaper

Wallis1 (ˈvalɪs)
 
n
the German name for Valais

Wallis2 (ˈwɒlɪs)
 
n
Sir Barnes (Neville). 1887--1979, English aeronautical engineer. He designed the airship R100, the Wellesley and Wellington bombers, and the bouncing bomb (1943), which was used to destroy the Ruhr dams during World War II

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prince
earlly 13c., from O.Fr. prince (12c.), from L. princeps (gen. principis) "first, chief, prince," lit. "that takes first" (adj.), from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + root of capere "to take" (see capable). Ger. cognate fürst, from O.H.G.
furist "first," is apparently an imitation of the Latin form. Colloquial meaning "admirable or generous person" is from 1911, Amer.Eng.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

hal- pref.
Variant of halo-.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

HAL definition


1. HAL 9000, the murdering computer on the spaceship in the science fiction classic "2001, A Space Odyssey" by Arthur C. Clark.
"HAL" is "IBM" with each letter changed to the one before and there is an unconfirmed rumour that 9000 is the sum of the various IBM computer numbers that were in service at the time. However, in the sequel "2010", Clarke emphatically denies that HAL's name is supposed to be "one step ahead of IBM". It is, rather, short for "heuristic algorithm".
2. Hardware Abstraction Layer.
(1995-11-09)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
HAL
hardware abstraction layer
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Prince definition


the title generally applied to the chief men of the state. The "princes of the provinces" (1 Kings 20:14) were the governors or lord-lieutenants of the provinces. So also the "princes" mentioned in Dan. 6:1, 3, 4, 6, 7 were the officers who administered the affairs of the provinces; the "satraps" (as rendered in R.V.). These are also called "lieutenants" (Esther 3:12; 8:9; R.V., "satraps"). The promised Saviour is called by Daniel (9:25) "Messiah the Prince" (Heb. nagid); compare Acts 3:15; 5:31. The angel Micheal is called (Dan. 12:1) a "prince" (Heb. sar, whence "Sarah," the "princes").

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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