hat-trick

hat trick

noun
1.
Cricket. the knocking off by one bowler of three wickets with three successive pitches: so called because formerly such a bowler was rewarded with a hat.
2.
Ice Hockey, Soccer. three goals or points scored by one player in one game.
3.
Baseball. a series of a base hit, a two-base hit, a three-base hit, and a home run achieved in any order by one player in one game.
4.
a clever or adroitly deceptive maneuver.

Origin:
1875–80; 1955–60 for def 2

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Hat-trick
Collins
World English Dictionary
hat-trick
 
n
1.  cricket the achievement of a bowler in taking three wickets with three successive balls
2.  any achievement of three points, victories, awards, etc within a given period, esp three goals scored by the same player in a soccer match

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hat trick
c.1877, originally from cricket, "taking three wickets on three bowls;" extended to other sports (esp. ice hockey) c.1909. Allegedly because it entitled the bowler to receive a hat from his club commemorating the feat (or entitled him to pass the hat for a cash collection), but also infl. by the image
of a conjurer pulling things from his hat (though hat trick in this sense is not attested until 1886).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

hat trick definition


In some sports, such as ice hockey, three goals by one player in a single game: “Lemieux scores for the third time tonight; he finally has the hat trick he's been looking for all season.”

Note: By extension, a hat trick is an outstanding performance by an individual, or a particularly clever or adroit maneuver: “She pulled off a hat trick with her presentation to the committee.”
Note: The phrase originally referred to a hat traditionally given to a cricket player who scored three wickets, or goals.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature