Hippocratic oath

Hippocratic oath

noun
an oath embodying the duties and obligations of physicians, usually taken by those about to enter upon the practice of medicine.

Origin:
1740–50

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Collins
World English Dictionary
Hippocratic oath (ˌhɪpəʊˈkrætɪk)
 
n
an oath taken by a doctor to observe a code of medical ethics supposedly derived from that of Hippocrates

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Hippocratic oath
1747, in the spirit of Hippocrates (c.460-377 B.C.E.), but not written by him.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Hippocratic Oath n.
An oath of ethical professional behavior sworn by new physicians and attributed to Hippocrates.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Hippocratic oath [(hip-uh-krat-ik)]

A traditional oath of physicians, who pledge to practice medicine according to the ideals and moral principles put forth by Hippocrates.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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