hypertext

[hahy-per-tekst]
noun
a method of storing data through a computer program that allows a user to create and link fields of information at will and to retrieve the data nonsequentially.

Origin:
1970–75

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
hypertext (ˈhaɪpəˌtɛkst)
 
n
computer software and hardware that allows users to create, store, and view text and move between related items easily and in a nonsequential way; a word or phrase can be selected to link users to another part of the same document or to a different document

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
hypertext   (hī'pər-těkst')  Pronunciation Key 
A computer-based text retrieval system that enables a user to access particular locations or files in webpages or other electronic documents by clicking on links within specific webpages or documents.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

hypertext definition


The entire chain of hyperlinks that connects a series of related Web pages.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

hypertext definition

hypertext
A term coined by Ted Nelson around 1965 for a collection of documents (or "nodes") containing cross-references or "links" which, with the aid of an interactive browser program, allow the reader to move easily from one document to another.
The extension of hypertext to include other media - sound, graphics, and video - has been termed "hypermedia", but is usually just called "hypertext", especially since the advent of the World-Wide Web and HTML.
(2000-09-10)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Carr writes about his own inability to concentrate amid all the hypertext
  links, new-mail pings and blinking banner ads.
People who read hypertext comprehend and learn less, studies show, than those
  who read the same material in printed form.
Fragments of hypertext systems are available from several vendors.
Each site is connected to the others in the ring by a hypertext link so people
  can click to go from site to site in the ring.
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