lubber

lubber

[luhb-er]
noun
1.
a big, clumsy, stupid person; lout.
2.
an awkward or unskilled sailor; landlubber.
adjective
3.
clumsy; stupid; lubberly.
verb (used without object)
4.
to behave like a lubber, especially in the handling of a boat.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English lobre. See lob1, -er1

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World English Dictionary
lubber (ˈlʌbə)
 
n
1.  a big, awkward, or stupid person
2.  short for landlubber
 
[C14 lobre, probably from Scandinavian. See lob1]
 
'lubberly
 
adj, —adv
 
'lubberliness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lubber
mid-14c., "big, clumsy, stupid fellow who lives in idleness," from lobre, earlier lobi "lazy lout," related to lob, and probably of Scandinavian origin. A sailors' word since 16c. (cf. landlubber), but earliest use was of lazy monks (cf. abbey-lubber). Cf. also lubberwort, the name of the mythical herb
that produces laziness (1540s); and Lubberland "imaginary land of plenty without work" (1590s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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