follow Dictionary.com

What does Boxing Day have to do with boxing?

Mesopotamia

[mes-uh-puh-tey-mee-uh] /ˌmɛs ə pəˈteɪ mi ə/
noun
1.
an ancient region in W Asia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers: now part of Iraq.
Related forms
Mesopotamian, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for Mesopotamia
  • This makes her different from the rest of the demons in Mesopotamia.
  • Ships from the harbour at these ancient port cities established trade with Mesopotamia.
British Dictionary definitions for Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia

/ˌmɛsəpəˈteɪmɪə/
noun
1.
a region of SW Asia between the lower and middle reaches of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers: site of several ancient civilizations
Word Origin
Latin from Greek mesopotamia (khora) (the land) between rivers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for Mesopotamia

ancient name for the land that lies between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers (in modern Iraq), from Greek mesopotamia (khora), literally "a country between two rivers," from fem. of mesopotamos, from mesos "middle" (see medial (adj.)) + potamos "river" (see potamo-).

In 19c. the word sometimes was used in the sense of "anything which gives irrational or inexplicable comfort to the hearer," based on the story of the old woman who told her pastor that she "found great support in that comfortable word Mesopotamia" ["Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable," 1870]. The place was called Mespot (1917) by British soldiers serving there in World War I. Related: Mesopotamian.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Mesopotamia in Culture
Mesopotamia [(mes-uh-puh-tay-mee-uh)]

A region of western Asia, in what is now Iraq, known as the “cradle of civilization.” Western writing first developed there, done with sticks on clay tablets. Agricultural organization on a large scale also began in Mesopotamia, along with work in bronze and iron (see Bronze Age and Iron Age). Governmental systems in the region were especially advanced (see Babylon and Hammurabi). A number of peoples lived in Mesopotamia, including the Sumerians, Akkadians, Hittites, and Assyrians.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Mesopotamia in the Bible

the country between the two rivers (Heb. Aram-naharaim; i.e., "Syria of the two rivers"), the name given by the Greeks and Romans to the region between the Euphrates and the Tigris (Gen. 24:10; Deut. 23:4; Judg. 3:8, 10). In the Old Testament it is mentioned also under the name "Padan-aram;" i.e., the plain of Aram, or Syria (Gen. 25:20). The northern portion of this fertile plateau was the original home of the ancestors of the Hebrews (Gen. 11; Acts 7:2). From this region Isaac obtained his wife Rebecca (Gen. 24:10, 15), and here also Jacob sojourned (28:2-7) and obtained his wives, and here most of his sons were born (35:26; 46:15). The petty, independent tribes of this region, each under its own prince, were warlike, and used chariots in battle. They maintained their independence till after the time of David, when they fell under the dominion of Assyria, and were absorbed into the empire (2 Kings 19:13).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for Mesopotamia

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for Mesopotamia

0
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with Mesopotamia

Nearby words for mesopotamia