moot

1 [moot]
adjective
1.
open to discussion or debate; debatable; doubtful: a moot point.
2.
of little or no practical value or meaning; purely academic.
3.
Chiefly Law. not actual; theoretical; hypothetical.
verb (used with object)
4.
to present or introduce (any point, subject, project, etc.) for discussion.
5.
to reduce or remove the practical significance of; make purely theoretical or academic.
6.
Archaic. to argue (a case), especially in a mock court.
noun
7.
an assembly of the people in early England exercising political, administrative, and judicial powers.
8.
an argument or discussion, especially of a hypothetical legal case.
9.
Obsolete. a debate, argument, or discussion.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English mot(e) meeting, assembly, Old English gemōt; cognate with Old Norse mōt, Dutch gemoet meeting. See meet1

mooter, noun
mootness, noun


1. disputable, disputed, unsettled. 4. debate, dispute, discuss.


1. indisputable. 4. agree.
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moot

2 [moot]
noun
1.
a ring gauge for checking the diameters of treenails.
verb (used with object)
2.
to bring (a treenail) to the proper diameter with a moot.

Origin:
1805–15; special use of dial. moot tree-stump, block of wood; cognate with Dutch moot piece

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
moot (muːt)
 
adj
1.  subject or open to debate: a moot point
 
vb
2.  (tr) to suggest or bring up for debate
3.  (intr) to plead or argue theoretical or hypothetical cases, as an academic exercise or as vocational training for law students
 
n
4.  a discussion or debate of a hypothetical case or point, held as an academic activity
5.  (in Anglo-Saxon England) an assembly, mainly in a shire or hundred, dealing with local legal and administrative affairs
 
[Old English gemōt; compare Old Saxon mōt, Middle High German muoze meeting]
 
'mooter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

moot
1154, from O.E. gemot "meeting" (especially of freemen, to discuss community affairs or mete justice), from P.Gmc. *ga-motan (cf. Old Low Frankish muot "encounter," M.Du. moet, M.H.G. muoz), from collective prefix *ga- + *motan (see meet (v.)). The adj. senses of "debatable"
and "not worth considering" arose from moot case, earlier simply moot (n.) "discussion of a hypothetical law case" (1531), in law student jargon, in ref. to students gathering to test their skills in mock cases.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Interior antennas have made much of this moot.
If you truly cannot repay your friend immediately, the question is moot.
The case could become moot before it ever has a chance to reach the high court.
He missed the free throw, of course, but it was moot.
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