Onondaga

Onondaga

[on-uhn-daw-guh, -dah-, -dey-]
noun, plural Onondagas (especially collectively) Onondaga for 1.
1.
a member of a tribe of Iroquoian Indians formerly inhabiting the region of Onondaga Lake.
2.
the dialect of the Seneca language spoken by these Indians.
3.
a salt lake in central New York. 5 miles (8 km) long; 1 mile (1.6 km) wide.

Origin:
< Onondaga onǫ́·tàʔke on the hill, the name of the main Onondaga town, at successive locations

Onondagan, adjective
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World English Dictionary
Onondaga (ˌɒnənˈdɑːɡə)
 
n , -gas, -ga
1.  Lake Onondaga a salt lake in central New York State. Area: about 13 sq km (5 sq miles)
2.  a member of a North American Indian Iroquois people formerly living between Lake Champlain and the St Lawrence River
3.  the language of this people, belonging to the Iroquoian family
 
[from Iroquois onõtáge', literally: on the top of the hill (the name of their principal village)]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Onondaga
tribe in the Iroquois Confederacy, 1684, named for its principal settlement, from Onondaga onontake, lit. "on the hill."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

onondaga

tribe of Iroquoian-speaking North American Indians who lived in what is now the U.S. state of New York. The Onondaga traditionally inhabited villages of wood and bark longhouses occupied by related families. They moved these houses periodically to plant new fields, to seek fresh supplies of firewood, and to be nearer fish and game. They grew corn (maize), beans, squash, sunflowers, and tobacco. A council of adult males in each community guided the village chiefs

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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