secrecy

[see-kruh-see]
noun, plural secrecies for 2, 3.
1.
the state or condition of being secret, hidden, or concealed: a meeting held in secrecy.
2.
privacy; retirement; seclusion.
3.
ability to keep a secret.
4.
the habit or characteristic of being secretive; reticence.

Origin:
1375–1425; obsolete secre (< Middle French secré secret) + -cy; replacing late Middle English secretee, equivalent to secre + -tee -ty2

antisecrecy, adjective
nonsecrecy, noun, plural nonsecrecies.
prosecrecy, adjective
semisecrecy, noun
supersecrecy, noun, plural supersecrecies.


1. confidentiality, privacy, stealth, covertness.
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World English Dictionary
secrecy (ˈsiːkrɪsɪ)
 
n , pl -cies
1.  the state or quality of being secret
2.  the state of keeping something secret
3.  the ability or tendency to keep things secret

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

secrecy
1423, secretee, "quality of being secret," from O.Fr. secré, variant of secret (see secret). Form altered late 16c. on model of primacy, etc.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
One of the barriers to publishing a story about diamond growers is that almost
  everyone involved is touchy about secrecy.
If the labs were so wonderful, they wouldn't have ridiculous secrecy and walls
  with no windows where they keep the animals.
But his private phobias about germs and secrecy were something else again.
There was such a great loss of life that it was a tightly held secret at the
  time, and that secrecy lingered.
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