sheathe

[sheeth]
verb (used with object), sheathed, sheathing.
1.
to put (a sword, dagger, etc.) into a sheath.
2.
to plunge (a sword, dagger, etc.) in something as if in a sheath.
3.
to enclose in or as if in a casing or covering.
4.
to cover or provide with a protective layer or sheathing: to sheathe a roof with copper.
5.
to cover (a cable, electrical connector, etc.) with a metal sheath for grounding.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English shethen, derivative of sheath

sheather, noun

sheath, sheathe.
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World English Dictionary
sheathe (ʃiːð)
 
vb
1.  to insert (a knife, sword, etc) into a sheath
2.  (esp of cats) to retract (the claws)
3.  to surface with or encase in a sheath or sheathing

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sheathe
c.1400, "to furnish (a sword, etc.) with a sheath," from sheath (q.v.); meaning "to put (a sword, etc.) in a sheath" is attested from c.1430.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They used the muscle cells to sheathe the outside of a bladder-shaped polymer scaffold, and the lining cells to cover the inside.
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