sin

1 [sin]
noun
1.
transgression of divine law: the sin of Adam.
2.
any act regarded as such a transgression, especially a willful or deliberate violation of some religious or moral principle.
3.
any reprehensible or regrettable action, behavior, lapse, etc.; great fault or offense: It's a sin to waste time.
verb (used without object), sinned, sinning.
4.
to commit a sinful act.
5.
to offend against a principle, standard, etc.
verb (used with object), sinned, sinning.
6.
to commit or perform sinfully: He sinned his crimes without compunction.
7.
to bring, drive, etc., by sinning: He sinned his soul to perdition.

Origin:
before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English syn(n) offense, misdeed; akin to German Sünde, Old Norse synd sin, Latin sōns guilty; (v.) derivative of the noun, replacing Middle English sin(i)gen, syn(i)gen, Old English syngian, itself derivative of the noun

sinlike, adjective
sinningly, adverb
sinningness, noun
unsinning, adjective


1. trespass, violation. 2. wrong, wickedness. 4. transgress, trespass.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

sin

2 [seen]
noun
1.
the 22nd letter of the hebrew alphabet.
2.
the consonant sound represented by this letter.

Origin:
1895–1900; < Hebrew śīn

sīn

[seen]
noun
the 12th letter of the Arabic alphabet.

Origin:
< Arabic

Sin

[seen]
noun
the Akkadian god of the moon: the counterpart of the Sumerian Nanna.

sin

Trigonometry.

sin

Symbol, Trigonometry. arc sine.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sin1 (sɪn)
 
n
1.  theol
 a.  transgression of God's known will or any principle or law regarded as embodying this
 b.  actual sin mortal sin original sin See also venial sin the condition of estrangement from God arising from such transgression
2.  any serious offence, as against a religious or moral principle
3.  any offence against a principle or standard
4.  informal live in sin (of an unmarried couple) to live together
 
vb , sins, sinning, sinned
5.  theol to commit a sin
6.  (usually foll by against) to commit an offence (against a person, principle, etc)
 
[Old English synn; related to Old Norse synth, Old High German suntea sin, Latin sons guilty]
 
'sinner1
 
n

sin2 (sɪn)
 
prep, —conj, —adv
a Scot dialect word for since

sin3 (siːn)
 
n
See shin a variant of shin, the 21st letter in the Hebrew alphabet (שׂ), transliterated as S

sin4 (saɪn)
 
abbreviation for
sine

SIN or S.I.N.
 
abbreviation for
social insurance number
 
S.I.N. or S.I.N.
 
abbreviation for

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sin
O.E. synn "moral wrongdoing, offense against God, misdeed," from P.Gmc. *sundjo (cf. O.S. sundia, O.Fris. sende, M.Du. sonde, Ger. Sünde "sin, transgression, trespass, offense"), probably ult. "true" (cf. Goth. sonjis, O.N. sannr "true"), from PIE *es-ont-, prp. of base *es- "to be" (see
is). The semantic development is via notion of "to be truly the one (who is guilty)," as in O.N. phrase verð sannr at "be found guilty of," and the use of the phrase "it is being" in Hittite confessional formula. The same process probably yielded the L. word sons (gen. sontis) "guilty, criminal" from prp. of sum, esse "to be, that which is." Some etymologists believe the Gmc. word was an early borrowing directly from the L. genitive. Sin-eater is attested from 1686. To live in sin "cohabit without marriage" is from 1838. Ice hockey slang sin bin "penalty box" is attested from 1950.

sin
O.E. syngian "to commit sin," from synn (see sin (n.)). Cf. Du. zondigen, Ger. sündigen. Form alt. from M.E. sunigen by influence of the noun.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
sin  
Abbreviation of sine
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
sin
sine
SIN
Changi International Airport (Singapore)
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Sin definition


is "any want of conformity unto or transgression of the law of God" (1 John 3:4; Rom. 4:15), in the inward state and habit of the soul, as well as in the outward conduct of the life, whether by omission or commission (Rom. 6:12-17; 7:5-24). It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral governor who vindicates his law with penalties. The soul that sins is always conscious that his sin is (1) intrinsically vile and polluting, and (2) that it justly deserves punishment, and calls down the righteous wrath of God. Hence sin carries with it two inalienable characters, (1) ill-desert, guilt (reatus); and (2) pollution (macula).", Hodge's Outlines. The moral character of a man's actions is determined by the moral state of his heart. The disposition to sin, or the habit of the soul that leads to the sinful act, is itself also sin (Rom. 6:12-17; Gal. 5:17; James 1:14, 15). The origin of sin is a mystery, and must for ever remain such to us. It is plain that for some reason God has permitted sin to enter this world, and that is all we know. His permitting it, however, in no way makes God the author of sin. Adam's sin (Gen. 3:1-6) consisted in his yielding to the assaults of temptation and eating the forbidden fruit. It involved in it, (1) the sin of unbelief, virtually making God a liar; and (2) the guilt of disobedience to a positive command. By this sin he became an apostate from God, a rebel in arms against his Creator. He lost the favour of God and communion with him; his whole nature became depraved, and he incurred the penalty involved in the covenant of works. Original sin. "Our first parents being the root of all mankind, the guilt of their sin was imputed, and the same death in sin and corrupted nature were conveyed to all their posterity, descending from them by ordinary generation." Adam was constituted by God the federal head and representative of all his posterity, as he was also their natural head, and therefore when he fell they fell with him (Rom. 5:12-21; 1 Cor. 15:22-45). His probation was their probation, and his fall their fall. Because of Adam's first sin all his posterity came into the world in a state of sin and condemnation, i.e., (1) a state of moral corruption, and (2) of guilt, as having judicially imputed to them the guilt of Adam's first sin. "Original sin" is frequently and properly used to denote only the moral corruption of their whole nature inherited by all men from Adam. This inherited moral corruption consists in, (1) the loss of original righteousness; and (2) the presence of a constant proneness to evil, which is the root and origin of all actual sin. It is called "sin" (Rom. 6:12, 14, 17; 7:5-17), the "flesh" (Gal. 5:17, 24), "lust" (James 1:14, 15), the "body of sin" (Rom. 6:6), "ignorance," "blindness of heart," "alienation from the life of God" (Eph. 4:18, 19). It influences and depraves the whole man, and its tendency is still downward to deeper and deeper corruption, there remaining no recuperative element in the soul. It is a total depravity, and it is also universally inherited by all the natural descendants of Adam (Rom. 3:10-23; 5:12-21; 8:7). Pelagians deny original sin, and regard man as by nature morally and spiritually well; semi-Pelagians regard him as morally sick; Augustinians, or, as they are also called, Calvinists, regard man as described above, spiritually dead (Eph. 2:1; 1 John 3:14). The doctrine of original sin is proved, (1.) From the fact of the universal sinfulness of men. "There is no man that sinneth not" (1 Kings 8:46; Isa. 53:6; Ps. 130:3; Rom. 3:19, 22, 23; Gal. 3:22). (2.) From the total depravity of man. All men are declared to be destitute of any principle of spiritual life; man's apostasy from God is total and complete (Job 15:14-16; Gen. 6:5,6). (3.) From its early manifestation (Ps. 58:3; Prov. 22:15). (4.) It is proved also from the necessity, absolutely and universally, of regeneration (John 3:3; 2 Cor. 5:17). (5.) From the universality of death (Rom. 5:12-20). Various kinds of sin are mentioned, (1.) "Presumptuous sins," or as literally rendered, "sins with an uplifted hand", i.e., defiant acts of sin, in contrast with "errors" or "inadvertencies" (Ps. 19:13). (2.) "Secret", i.e., hidden sins (19:12); sins which escape the notice of the soul. (3.) "Sin against the Holy Ghost" (q.v.), or a "sin unto death" (Matt. 12:31, 32; 1 John 5:16), which amounts to a wilful rejection of grace. Sin, a city in Egypt, called by the Greeks Pelusium, which means, as does also the Hebrew name, "clayey" or "muddy," so called from the abundance of clay found there. It is called by Ezekel (Ezek. 30:15) "the strength of Egypt, "thus denoting its importance as a fortified city. It has been identified with the modern Tineh, "a miry place," where its ruins are to be found. Of its boasted magnificence only four red granite columns remain, and some few fragments of others.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

sin

see live in sin; more sinned against than sinning; multitude of sins; ugly as sin; wages of sin.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences for Sin
He also guest directed a scene in sin city, which uses a similar layout.
Orthodox likewise believe that baptism removes what they call the ancestral sin
  of adam.
The old man dies the new man is born free from ancestral sin.
The ability to sin, for example, is not a power but a defect or an infirmity.
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