slogan

[sloh-guhn]
noun
1.
a distinctive cry, phrase, or motto of any party, group, manufacturer, or person; catchword or catch phrase.
2.
a war cry or gathering cry, as formerly used among the Scottish clans.

Origin:
1505–15; < Scots Gaelic sluagh-ghairm, equivalent to sluagh army, host (cf. slew2) + gairm cry

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World English Dictionary
slogan (ˈsləʊɡən)
 
n
1.  a distinctive or topical phrase used in politics, advertising, etc
2.  (Scot) history a Highland battle cry
 
[C16: from Gaelic sluagh-ghairm war cry, from sluagh army + gairm cry]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

slogan
1513, "battle cry," from Gaelic sluagh-ghairm "battle cry used by Scottish Highland or Irish clans," from sluagh "army, host, slew" + gairm "a cry." Metaphoric sense of "distinctive word or phrase used by a political or other group" is first attested 1704. Sloganeering is attested from 1941.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Commercial use of the slogan potentially is a multimillion-dollar business.
One trustee ran with the idea of raising money to help students, the slogan was
  coined, and the effort began shortly thereafter.
My slogan is swimming for peace, but also achieving the impossible.
The final requirement for a marketing masterpiece is an enigmatic, meaningless
  slogan which hints at profound conceptual depth.
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