Sussex

Sussex

[suhs-iks]
noun
1.
a former county in SE England: divided into East Sussex and West Sussex.
2.
one of an English breed of red beef cattle.
3.
one of an English breed of chickens, raised chiefly for marketing as roasters.
4.
a kingdom of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy in SE England.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Sussex
Collins
World English Dictionary
Sussex (ˈsʌsɪks)
 
n
1.  (until 1974) a county of SE England, now divided into the separate counties of East Sussex and West Sussex
2.  (in Anglo-Saxon England) the kingdom of the South Saxons, which became a shire of the kingdom of Wessex in the early 9th century a.d
3.  a breed of red beef cattle originally from Sussex
4.  a heavy and long-established breed of domestic fowl used principally as a table bird

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

sussex

(from Old English Su Seaxe, South Saxons), one of the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England. It ultimately coincided in area with the modern counties of East Sussex and West Sussex, although Hastings in East Sussex appears to have been sometimes separate. According to the tradition preserved in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a certain Aelle landed in AD 477 at a place now covered by the sea, south of Selsey Bill, and defeated the Britons. Archaeological evidence suggests that there was Germanic settlement in the area beginning in the 5th century. The Venerable Bede, writing in the 8th century, says that Aelle held supremacy over all the peoples south of the Humber, the only king of Sussex to hold that eminence. In the 680s St. Wilfrid, expelled from Northumbria, spent several years converting the South Saxons to Christianity. At that time their king was Aethelwalh, but after his death Sussex was divided among several kings. There were still kings early in the reign (757-796) of Offa of Mercia, but later they are named as ealdormen. In the 9th century Sussex fell to the kings of Wessex.

Learn more about Sussex with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature